/MEng Computer Science

IoC Partner

Provided by: Durham University

Course Area: North East

Course Code: G406

Course Type: Degree (Honours)

Start date: 20211004

End date: 20250731

Subjects: Computer Science

Price: Over £10,000

Delivery Method: Face to face

Course overview

Description

Our Computer Science degrees balance fundamental knowledge and practical application in order to provide you with both specialised and transferable skills that are greatly valued in the marketplace. The course emphasises from the start both programming and mathematical skills that allow, in the later years engagement through the ‘Individual Project’ with cutting-edge research being done in the department.

 

Study Abroad

Computer Science is an international discipline and living and working in another country is a valuable addition to your CV. We are part of the SOCRATES/ERASMUS and University Exchange programme, which encourages you to study for part of your course in a university worldwide. You can request to transfer onto the MEng Computer Science with Year Abroad (G407) programme at the beginning of your second year and after your second or third year of study in Durham will spend a year studying at another EU or worldwide university, and then return to Durham for your penultimate or final year.

 

Further information on these study abroad opportunities can be found here.

 

Placement Year

You may be able to take a work placement. Find out more.

Who is this course for

Subject requirements, level and grade

A level offer – A*AA Including Mathematics.

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma – D*DD and Mathematics A level at grade A (or equivalent) is required.

IB Diploma score – 38 With 766 in higher level subjects, including Mathematics.

 

In addition to satisfying the University’s general entry requirements, please note:

We welcome applications from those with other qualifications equivalent to our standard entry requirements and from mature students with non-standard qualifications or who may have had a break in their study. For more information contact our Admissions Selectors.

 

If you do not satisfy our general entry requirements, the Foundation Centre offers multidisciplinary degrees to prepare you for a range of specified degree courses.

 

If you are an international student who does not meet the requirements for direct entry to this degree, you may be eligible to take an International Foundation Year pathway programme at the Durham University International Study Centre.

 

We are pleased to consider applications for deferred entry.

 

Science A levels

Applicants taking Science A levels that include a practical component will normally be required to take and pass this as a condition of entry. This applies only to applicants sitting A levels with an English examination board.

 

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

 

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/apply

 

Information relevant to your country

www.durham.ac.uk/international/country.information/

What will I learn

Year 1

You will undertake five computer science modules, which cover programming, the characteristics of computers and computing systems, and the mathematical foundations of the subject. You will also be introduced to the concept and philosophy of computational thinking and explore cutting-edge technological applications of recent research. You will undertake an elective module, which may be from elsewhere within the Department, Faculty or University. Once you complete your first year you will have had a thorough introduction to the fundamentals of computer science and to the principles, practices and methodologies that make computer science unique to a scientific subject. You will also have had a glimpse at aspects of computer science research that have enabled major technological advances in society.

 

Compulsory modules

  • Programming
  • Computational Thinking
  • Algorithms and Data Structures
  • Computer Systems
  • Mathematics for Computer Science

 

Year 2

You will study six modules covering a core set of topics. One module Software Engineering (double module) involves a team software development project and enables you to usually work with external organisations and gain practical software development experience. Other compulsory topics include, for example, computer networks, parallel and distributed computing, concurrency, data structures, algorithms and complexity, image processing, different programming paradigms, systems programming, security, aspects of artificial intelligence, and computer graphics. The topics undertaken in the second year prepare you with an excellent grounding in a range of fundamental subjects within computer science, ready for subsequent specialisation in your third year. By the end of the second year, you will be in a position to make informed judgements as to which particular aspects of the subject you might wish to focus on.

 

Compulsory modules

  • Networks and Systems
  • Programming Paradigms
  • Software Engineering
  • Software Methodologies
  • Theory of Computation

 

Year 3

A key element of the third year is the individual project (which is a double module). This is undertaken under the direct supervision of a member of staff and gives you the opportunity to tackle a specific computing task in much greater depth than is possible for other modules. At the end of the project, you will write a technical paper describing your findings. You are given a considerable amount of choice as to the subject of your projects; indeed, you can suggest specific projects yourself. In addition, you get to choose the four other modules that you undertake in the third year.

 

A range of modules is offered (many reflecting current research interests of staff) for example, previous modules have included: theoretical computer science, software and software systems, computing methodologies, applications and contemporary computer science (with the latter topic engaging with modern research within computer science that is highly relevant to current technological advances and applications). There is also the opportunity to follow specific modules offered such as a module involving the teaching of computer science in schools, giving an early taste of teaching computer science to those interested in pursuing it as a career or on other career pathways where a public understanding of science is required.

 

Year 4

You will again undertake a significant individual project (this time a triple module). This gives you the exciting opportunity to take your third-year projects even further, if you wish, possibly so that the resulting research might be published in a journal or at a conference, and possibly as a prelude to a postgraduate degree in Computer Science. However, if you do not wish to continue with the topic of your third-year project, there is the opportunity to do another substantial piece of work in an entirely different area of computer science (again, of your choosing). Just as in the third year, you will get to choose the three other modules that you undertake in the fourth year; again, just as in the third year, there is a range of modules offered, including advanced versions of some of the third-year modules.

 

We review course structures and core content (in light of e.g. external and student feedback) every year, and will publish finalised core requirements for 2021 entry from September 2020.

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